Please, Mister Postman

The moving sequel to the Sunday Times bestseller, This Boy. 

This highly acclaimed novel is available in Hardback, Paperback, Kindle and Audio Book.

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Before the internet, social media, British Telecom and mobile phones there was the mighty GPO. The General Post Office had a virtual monopoly on all forms of communication. One in every twenty of the working population worked for this arm of the civil service.

In 1968 having stacked shelves at Tesco and failed in my great ambition to be a rock and roll star, I became one of them, joining as a postman aged 18. By the age of twenty I had a wife and three children to support and was living on a huge council estate in Slough. This book records working class life in the 1970’s, my early involvement with the trade union movement and the tragedy that stalked my sister, orphaned in her teens and widowed in her twenties.

‘Please, Mister Postman’ won the National Book Club’s “Biography of the Year” award.

Testimonials

  • The best political testament I have ever read
    Peter WilbyNew Statesman
  • This boy can write…there’s nothing second-rate about his writing. He is a natural
  • A wonderful elegy for a life that has only just passed into history... Beautifully written, affecting and sad
    John RentoulIndependent on Sunday
  • A fascinating piece of social history
    Daisy GoodwinSunday Times
  • Johnson’s writing style is easy, relaxed, self-deprecating. His recall and eye for detail are impressive
    Chris MullinObserver
  • Full of delights
    Francis WheenMail on Sunday
  • Like Johnson's previous memoirs, this latest instalment carries a first-class stamp
    Caroline JowettDaily Express
  • Witty, self-deprecating, sometimes uproariously funny and sometimes unbearably sad. It shines like a candle in the naughty world of inauthentic politicians and public alienation
    David MarquandNew Statesman
  • Immensely readable
  • Beautifullly written... and vividly observed

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